OLLAWAY
18/1/13 at 17:01pm

Roger Dat \rä′jər-ˈdat\ v.

  1. verbally style on a shortcake by implying she should “get like u” in the new year. Sentence: Scuze me? Bitch, roger dat!
14/1/13 at 19:12pm
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amandaminaj:

” Some things never change. “

21/5/12 at 19:13pm
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02/4/12 at 9:00am
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30/3/12 at 12:00pm
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amandaminaj:

” Some things never change. “

23/2/12 at 21:36pm
12/11/11 at 16:53pm
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ollaway:

Drake’s Take Care leaked last night and, while I was definitely looking forward to copping this album, I couldn’t resist listening to the leak first to determine whether or not I should actually buy dat shit. Let’s roll!

ZOMG PLZ T8k CURR

Album: Take Care

Artist: Drake

Released: November 15, 2011

Genre: Hip hop, R&B

Length: 74:07

Label: Young Money, Cash Money, Universal Republic



1. “Over My Dead Body” featuring Chantal Kreviazuk—This was a great introductory track. I enjoyed the unique style…this track really reminded me of “Lust for Life” from So Far Gone, just less pussified. I would call the chorus an interesting undertaking with Chantal Kreviazuk, but the lyrics of said hook were not as well thought out as the rest of the song. The lyrics were satisfactory on this track, but personally the “dim sum” Asian joke made this track for me.

2. “Shot For Me”—I’m not going to act like Drake’s never done the whiny-singing stuff before, but I wasn’t really impressed with this. I’m sure there will be chicks out there who dig this, but this sounded to me like Drake was getting it up the ass and really enjoying it.

3. “Headlines”—This single is already out and, while it breaks the slow pace of the first half of the album for a brief bit of excitement, the hook is beyond dissatisfying compared to the verses.

4. “Crew Love” featuring The Weeknd—So, um, this track is five minutes long and we don’t get to hear Drake until 3:40. As a song itself, this was interesting, but nothing I’d put up in the first three tracks. You should be trying to get people hyped for the rest of the album at this point, not winding down like this. The Drake part was by far the most captivating, but I would be embarrassed to put out a song on my own album that was 75% not me.

5. “Take Care” featuring Rihanna—This song seemed like something very deep—apparently Rihanna actually wrote the chorus herself on this track, an interesting change up from the typical “I want this song to be a hit, I’ll send Rihanna the hook and have her sing it” style. I’d say that having her write for this is kind of a big deal considering she didn’t pen a word of her last album.* There was a very compelling and hypnotic breakdown in the middle featuring a unique sample that I would’ve liked to have seen more of in the song as well. Overall, this didn’t stand out as much as it could have because it was located in the huge muck of slow songs in the forefront.

6. “Marvins Room”—I can’t say this is hip hop in the same sense of Jay-Z anymore, but this huge plunge into R&B territory proved a success in my eyes—nobody else right now is going to give you this vulnerability, though this is probably a bigger turn on for the uteruses than the duderuses. And besides, who’s sampled drunk calling before?

6.5. “Buried Alive (Interlude)” featuring Kendrick Lamar—I’m not really sure where Drake was going with this. This portion came on the same track as “Marvins Room” but seemed to be something completely different, aside from the same lethargic pace that has been dominating the album insofar. Like “Crew Love,” this track was dominated by another artist—the only reason I can’t say this song was all Lamar was because he merged this into “Marvins Room” on the album, although they seem to clearly be two separate works. I can’t say I love this because half of it was Lamar rapping about Drake’s problems, but I’m glad he’s brought the classic “BJ versus Church” debate back to the forefront.

7. “Underground Kings”—Yep. Liked it. Things picked up here and added some variety…and finally a song that had more BPM than my grandmother’s heartbeat. He could’ve slid this up near the beginning and I’m sure people would feel less dragged through the mud on the first few tracks.

8. “We’ll Be Fine”—It’s tracks like this that beg the question “Is Drake an alcoholic? I’m really concerned about him.” His verses were acceptable and the hook was killer, overall making for a great song to get pumped up to—as for Birdman’s outro…this was probably his idea of submitting a verse. I have no idea what he was thinking he contributed to the song by adding a full minute of empty shout out shit, but this is further proof that, no matter how much you dislike Drake, I’m pretty sure he can shit on everything Birdman’s ever done in one sitting.

9. “Make Me Proud” featuring Nicki Minaj—Before we begin, I’d like everyone to know that I’ve been a member of Team Minaj for over two years, so I may be biased. That being said, I really enjoyed this song. They have both had better verses in their careers, but the chemistry between these two never fails to impress me. I’ve always enjoyed that Nicki typically avoids bragging about all the shit she owns in exchange for stuff with deeper meaning, but here she turned that around and went right for it. She then transitions into a honeyed bridge about giving it all up, in effect giving more magnitude to said bridge by refuting everything she just mentioned. She then does some lines that are clever but pretty cornball. Overall probably the catchiest track on the album.

10. “Lord Knows” featuring Rick Ross—Nice sample, a song you should definitely hear for yourself. Drake had a few too many hackneyed lines on this; “To pull all your skeletons out the closet like Halloween decorations” was a bit much for me. I do not really like Rick Ross but his verse was good, though nothing new.

11. “Cameras”—Despite a repetitious and uncreative hook, this song has a nice sample and some solid verses.

11.5 “Good Ones Go (Interlude)”—Another slow one, although potentially better than some of the others had it been developed into a full song. Since it’s pretty bare, the majority is Drake moaning like some guy is doing him up right.

12. “Doing It Wrong” featuring Stevie Wonder—Oh…another slow one?????? Okay. He’s singing pretty high on this one and the chorus needn’t have been repeated, but Stevie Wonder made for a tinging and emotional harmonica outro.

13. “The Real Her” featuring Lil Wayne & André 3000—Slow Drake song featuring shout outs to strippers from Houston, Atlanta, and Vegas? Sorry, I’ve already got some of those. I’ll skip straight to the featured verses—Lil Wayne does an okay verse on this, though I’m personally tired of the Stevie Wonder/blindness lines. André had some good lines in his verse, but his flow + that beat = catastrophe.

14. “HYFR”—This stands for “Hell Yeah Fucking Right,” FYI. It was an interesting idea to have Lil Wayne on the hook instead of Drake, although it proved to sound horrifying. Wayne’s verse was better than I expected…terrible metaphors were rarer here. Drake was good, too, although I feel like I’m starting to notice a pattern with all these songs about being in love with hoes and not being real with them as much as you should.

15. “Look What You’ve Done”—This song is also about a hoe…a hoe that happens to be Drake’s mother. This track is about his mother and uncle, the two people who raised him, and how much he appreciates them. Although I feel like the sample in the background was a bit too much (just piano would’ve made for a simple beat to an emotional track), you can feel that this track came from the heart more than any of the others insofar and is a genuinely heartfelt track, I think.

16. “Practice”—Slow and about a hoe. Not bad per se, but nothing that anyone should be excited about because it’s just more of the same.

17. “The Ride” featuring The Weeknd—word is this is part of the album, but I couldn’t find it anywhere. I really searched, so I’m sorry to let you guys down, but I have no idea where to find this track. I will update the review accordingly when I do find this one…hopefully it has Drake on it, though.**

 

I was sort of expecting something a little harder than this (pauz), but I’m not really sure why. I guess I just thought everyone would be going HAM after Watch The Throne came out in order to show that they can keep up. Overall, this is probably one more for the ladies than the fellows. The slow serenading, however, seemed like something the alleged Florence + the Machine collabo would’ve been good for, but apparently both artists were just too busy hanging out. There are a number of tracks on here that I think are definitely worth getting, but listening to 17 in a row is just something that I cannot do more than once. His heart was definitely in the right place, but hearing slow songs sobbing over strippers happened too many times in this album. Drake’s Take Care gets a 60%.

★★★★★★☆☆☆☆

*Rumor debunked—this hook is actually from Gil Scott-Heron’s “I’ll Take Care of You.” Shout out to clintonhillchill for bringing this information to the forefront.

**Now this track is (surprise!) another slow one, but this one was definitely done right. It was a much better ender than “Practice” and I can see why Drake says this is his favorite album on the track. This one is slow, but a slow roaster that will slide down your ears, if you know what I’m trying to say. Much better finale, but the overall album rating will stand at 60%.

07/11/11 at 21:12pm
Take Care Album Review

Drake’s Take Care leaked last night and, while I was definitely looking forward to copping this album, I couldn’t resist listening to the leak first to determine whether or not I should actually buy dat shit. Let’s roll!

ZOMG PLZ T8k CURR

Album: Take Care

Artist: Drake

Released: November 15, 2011

Genre: Hip hop, R&B

Length: 74:07

Label: Young Money, Cash Money, Universal Republic


1. “Over My Dead Body” featuring Chantal Kreviazuk—This was a great introductory track. I enjoyed the unique style…this track really reminded me of “Lust for Life” from So Far Gone, just less pussified. I would call the chorus an interesting undertaking with Chantal Kreviazuk, but the lyrics of said hook were not as well thought out as the rest of the song. The lyrics were satisfactory on this track, but personally the “dim sum” Asian joke made this track for me.

2. “Shot For Me”—I’m not going to act like Drake’s never done the whiny-singing stuff before, but I wasn’t really impressed with this. I’m sure there will be chicks out there who dig this, but this sounded to me like Drake was getting it up the ass and really enjoying it.

3. “Headlines”—This single is already out and, while it breaks the slow pace of the first half of the album for a brief bit of excitement, the hook is beyond dissatisfying compared to the verses.

4. “Crew Love” featuring The Weeknd—So, um, this track is five minutes long and we don’t get to hear Drake until 3:40. As a song itself, this was interesting, but nothing I’d put up in the first three tracks. You should be trying to get people hyped for the rest of the album at this point, not winding down like this. The Drake part was by far the most captivating, but I would be embarrassed to put out a song on my own album that was 75% not me.

5. “Take Care” featuring Rihanna—This song seemed like something very deep—apparently Rihanna actually wrote the chorus herself on this track, an interesting change up from the typical “I want this song to be a hit, I’ll send Rihanna the hook and have her sing it” style. I’d say that having her write for this is kind of a big deal considering she didn’t pen a word of her last album. There was a very compelling and hypnotic breakdown in the middle featuring a unique sample that I would’ve liked to have seen more of in the song as well. Overall, this didn’t stand out as much as it could have because it was located in the huge muck of slow songs in the forefront.

6. “Marvins Room”—I can’t say this is hip hop in the same sense of Jay-Z anymore, but this huge plunge into R&B territory proved a success in my eyes—nobody else right now is going to give you this vulnerability, though this is probably a bigger turn on for the uteruses than the duderuses. And besides, who’s sampled drunk calling before?

6.5. “Buried Alive (Interlude)” featuring Kendrick Lamar—I’m not really sure where Drake was going with this. This portion came on the same track as “Marvins Room” but seemed to be something completely different, aside from the same lethargic pace that has been dominating the album insofar. Like “Crew Love,” this track was dominated by another artist—the only reason I can’t say this song was all Lamar was because he merged this into “Marvins Room” on the album, although they seem to clearly be two separate works. I can’t say I love this because half of it was Lamar rapping about Drake’s problems, but I’m glad he’s brought the classic “BJ versus Church” debate back to the forefront.

7. “Underground Kings”—Yep. Liked it. Things picked up here and added some variety…and finally a song that had more BPM than my grandmother’s heartbeat. He could’ve slid this up near the beginning and I’m sure people would feel less dragged through the mud on the first few tracks.

8. “We’ll Be Fine”—It’s tracks like this that beg the question “Is Drake an alcoholic? I’m really concerned about him.” His verses were acceptable and the hook was killer, overall making for a great song to get pumped up to—as for Birdman’s outro…this was probably his idea of submitting a verse. I have no idea what he was thinking he contributed to the song by adding a full minute of empty shout out shit, but this is further proof that, no matter how much you dislike Drake, I’m pretty sure he can shit on everything Birdman’s ever done in one sitting.

9. “Make Me Proud” featuring Nicki Minaj—Before we begin, I’d like everyone to know that I’ve been a member of Team Minaj for over two years, so I may be biased. That being said, I really enjoyed this song. They have both had better verses in their careers, but the chemistry between these two never fails to impress me. I’ve always enjoyed that Nicki typically avoids bragging about all the shit she owns in exchange for stuff with deeper meaning, but here she turned that around and went right for it. She then transitions into a honeyed bridge about giving it all up, in effect giving more magnitude to said bridge by refuting everything she just mentioned. She then does some lines that are clever but pretty cornball. Overall probably the catchiest track on the album.

10. “Lord Knows” featuring Rick Ross—Nice sample, a song you should definitely hear for yourself. Drake had a few too many hackneyed lines on this; “To pull all your skeletons out the closet like Halloween decorations” was a bit much for me. I do not really like Rick Ross but his verse was good, though nothing new.

11. “Cameras”—Despite a repetitious and uncreative hook, this song has a nice sample and some solid verses.

11.5 “Good Ones Go (Interlude)”—Another slow one, although potentially better than some of the others had it been developed into a full song. Since it’s pretty bare, the majority is Drake moaning like some guy is doing him up right.

12. “Doing It Wrong” featuring Stevie Wonder—Oh…another slow one?????? Okay. He’s singing pretty high on this one and the chorus needn’t have been repeated, but Stevie Wonder made for a tinging and emotional harmonica outro.

13. “The Real Her” featuring Lil Wayne & André 3000—Slow Drake song featuring shout outs to strippers from Houston, Atlanta, and Vegas? Sorry, I’ve already got some of those. I’ll skip straight to the featured verses—Lil Wayne does an okay verse on this, though I’m personally tired of the Stevie Wonder/blindness lines. André had some good lines in his verse, but his flow + that beat = catastrophe.

14. “HYFR”—This stands for “Hell Yeah Fucking Right,” FYI. It was an interesting idea to have Lil Wayne on the hook instead of Drake, although it proved to sound horrifying. Wayne’s verse was better than I expected…terrible metaphors were rarer here. Drake was good, too, although I feel like I’m starting to notice a pattern with all these songs about being in love with hoes and not being real with them as much as you should.

15. “Look What You’ve Done”—This song is also about a hoe…a hoe that happens to be Drake’s mother. This track is about his mother and uncle, the two people who raised him, and how much he appreciates them. Although I feel like the sample in the background was a bit too much (just piano would’ve made for a simple beat to an emotional track), you can feel that this track came from the heart more than any of the others insofar and is a genuinely heartfelt track, I think.

16. “Practice”—Slow and about a hoe. Not bad per se, but nothing that anyone should be excited about because it’s just more of the same.

17. “The Ride” featuring The Weeknd—word is this is part of the album, but I couldn’t find it anywhere. I really searched, so I’m sorry to let you guys down, but I have no idea where to find this track. I will update the review accordingly when I do find this one…hopefully it has Drake on it, though.

 

I was sort of expecting something a little harder than this (pauz), but I’m not really sure why. I guess I just thought everyone would be going HAM after Watch The Throne came out in order to show that they can keep up. Overall, this is probably one more for the ladies than the fellows. The slow serenading, however, seemed like something the alleged Florence + the Machine collabo would’ve been good for, but apparently both artists were just too busy hanging out. There are a number of tracks on here that I think are definitely worth getting, but listening to 17 in a row is just something that I cannot do more than once. His heart was definitely in the right place, but hearing slow songs sobbing over strippers happened too many times in this album. Drake’s Take Care gets a 60%.

★★★★★★☆☆☆☆

08/10/11 at 19:27pm
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